Other Ordinances

Each year, FCHC collects publicly available data from the Fort Collins Police Services about how many tickets are being given under several municipal ordinances, particularly those which target life-sustaining activities (such as sleeping, resting, or sitting).

Some of these ordinances are written to cover a wide variety of “criminal” behaviors. For instance, the laws governing Fort Collins’ parks and natural areas make it illegal to rest/camp in those areas, but also addresses crimes as varied as flying drones, fishing without a license, or carrying a crossbow. It is impossible to tell from the raw numbers how many tickets were issued for camping vs. how many were issued for crossbow-related incidents.

However, in a 2018 memo issued by Fort Collins Police Services, FCPS states that in 2017, 67% of the tickets/warnings issued by Fort Collins Natural Areas Rangers were camping related. In 2016, it was 78%. In other words, far and away the most common “crime” being committed by homeless people in Fort Collins’ Natural Areas is lying down to rest. (Source: Fort Collins Police Services).

Prohibited acts in Natural Areas (including camping)

Natural Areas Ordinance 23-193, text and ticketing data (2013-2017)

Please note: ticketing data does not tell us how often people are contacted by police under an ordinance, instructed to change their behavior (even if they were not behaving illegally), told to “move along,” or otherwise pushed out of public spaces without a ticket being written. While police often regard contact as a neutral/benign action, people being contacted do not always experience it this way. In fact, being repeatedly singled out for police attention, contact, questioning, and control is often intimidating, oppressive, marginalizing, and can make a person less likely to trust the police or report concerning/dangerous/criminal behavior to them.

Prohibited acts in Parks and Recreation areas (including camping)

Recreation Areas Ordinance 23-203, text and ticketing data (2013-2017)

Please note: ticketing data does not tell us how often people are contacted by police under an ordinance, instructed to change their behavior (even if they were not behaving illegally), told to “move along,” or otherwise pushed out of public spaces without a ticket being written. While police often regard contact as a neutral/benign action, people being contacted do not always experience it this way. In fact, being repeatedly singled out for police attention, contact, questioning, and control is often intimidating, oppressive, marginalizing, and can make a person less likely to trust the police or report concerning/dangerous/criminal behavior to them.

Trespassing

Trespass Ordinance text and ticketing data (2013-2017)

Please note: ticketing data does not tell us how often people are contacted by police under an ordinance, instructed to change their behavior (even if they were not behaving illegally), told to “move along,” or otherwise pushed out of public spaces without a ticket being written. While police often regard contact as a neutral/benign action, people being contacted do not always experience it this way. In fact, being repeatedly singled out for police attention, contact, questioning, and control is often intimidating, oppressive, marginalizing, and can make a person less likely to trust the police or report concerning/dangerous/criminal behavior to them.

Bodily Waste Ticketing Info

Bodily waste ticketing data (2013-2017)

Bodily Waste Ticket Map 2013-2017

Please note: ticketing data does not tell us how often people are contacted by police under an ordinance, instructed to change their behavior (even if they were not behaving illegally), told to “move along,” threatened with a ticket, or otherwise subjected to police control without a ticket being written. While police often regard contact as a neutral/benign action, people being contacted do not always experience it this way. In fact, being repeatedly singled out for police attention, contact, questioning, and control is often intimidating, oppressive, marginalizing, and can make a person less likely to trust the police or report concerning/dangerous/criminal behavior to them.